The spread of COVID-19 is causing extensive disruption to all our lives. But for children with autism, it is twice more damage. It becomes incredibly hard for them to make adjustments, especially in the routine changes. The pressure can lead to an increase in stress, anxiety, and even depression. In unfortunate instances, it can negatively promote challenging behaviors. And for parents and caregivers of children with autism, the whole experience can mean a lot different. The struggle of juggling work and home responsibilities can somehow lead to emotional and mental exhaustion. So to help children and parents deal with the adjustment during this pandemic, here are some of the best things to do.

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Establish New Routines

To cope with the disruptions in this time of global health situation, it is useful to establish new routines. No, it does not have to be a total routine make-over because a small and little by little changes are enough to sustain a better function.  These new sets of tasks can help children with autism develop better emotional and mental strength and allows the whole family to avoid stress and anxiety as well. The entire family can begin by adjusting the morning routines and add something from there. Like for example, after waking up, let the kids arrange their beds before they head towards their breakfast. Or allow them to do some 5 to 10 minute stretching before they take a bath. Parents can also use the children’s school schedule as a guideline to add better transitions between activities and breaks.

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Transition From School To Home

It is essential to understand that children with autism will not easily comply with the changes in their routines, even if the task only requires a small effort. Regardless of what it is, autistic children will find it stressful and exhausting. During this pandemic time, the biggest challenge for them is not going to school. So for some, the whole experience can cause trauma and unwanted behavior. For others, it will need more than a simple transition. So to be able to arrange impressive progress of transitioning, parents should allow kids to still do what the kids are used to do. These include waking up early, taking a bath, putting on kids’ school uniforms, and even pretend to ride a bus to school. From there, the transition can happen by removing some of the daily school tasks in an alternate process. There should be an alternative activity that will take the spot of the familiar routine.

Aside from school, therapies will also need to transition. Since we need to reduce physical interactions during this time, treatment will shift to online platforms like that of BetterHelp. No need to worry because these platforms employ licensed therapies that are professional and knowledgeable.

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Create A School Space At Home

Children with autism love school, and not visiting it for an extended period can negatively affect their emotional and mental behavior. But since there are not many parents who can do due to the pandemic situation, they might as well create a school space at home. It will allow autistic children to feel and experience familiar habits regardless of a different environment. So to accomplish this, parents can try setting up a room that will enable school space activities. They can incorporate some of the children’s preferred classroom by putting up a desk and chairs.  Parents can also copy an educational ambiance by setting up a blackboard, piling up some books, and even arranging art materials inside the room. If possible, parents can also use visual support to help increase children’s understanding. To make it more interesting for kids, parents can allow the children to assist in creating their new school space at home.

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Dealing with the life effects of the pandemic is not easy. And for kids with autism experiencing challenging behavior during this time, parents must understand their essential roles in providing what’s best for them.